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New Leadership Program Launches in Fresno

BY Anne Vally
Anne Vally
Anne Vally was with The James Irvine Foundation from 2000 to 2013, last serving
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| Mar 25, 2013 2
As the San Joaquin Valley’s economic, social and educational challenges have gained more national attention, it’s easy to get lost in the myriad of well-documented problems and issues facing the valley.

However, we have also seen a groundswell of new energy and creative ideas bubbling up in the region. New leaders are harnessing the valley’s longstanding creativity and resilience, making instrumental strides towards a better future for the region. We see a unique opportunity to support these new leaders to bring the kinds of changes and social benefit they envision for the San Joaquin Valley. To do this, we are pleased to announce the launch of The James Irvine Foundation New Leadership Network.

As a long-time supporter and champion of the San Joaquin Valley, I’d like to offer some personal observations on what makes the New Leadership Network different.

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Irvine In The News: January 2013

BY Thuy Nguyen Kumar
Thuy Nguyen Kumar
As Communications Project Manager, Thuy provides project support for a broad ran
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| Feb 01, 2013

Irvine In The News: September 2012

BY Thuy Nguyen Kumar
Thuy Nguyen Kumar
As Communications Project Manager, Thuy provides project support for a broad ran
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| Oct 01, 2012

In September 2012, the following published articles mentioned the work of the Foundation or our grantees:

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Exploring Arts Engagement in our Priority Regions

BY Rick Noguchi
Rick Noguchi
Rick Noguchi has been with Irvine since 2008 and helps oversee many of the Found
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| Apr 26, 2012

It is well known that the Inland Empire and San Joaquin Valley have experienced rapid population growth followed by a severe economic downturn that left both regions struggling. The Irvine Foundation has prioritized these two regions for support because they are so drastically under-resourced by philanthropic dollars and have so much need. Within our Arts program, we created our new Exploring Engagement Fund for Priority Regions as part of our commitment to these two regions, and I was pleased to see the enthusiasm for the fund during two recent meetings I attended in Fresno and Redlands to answer questions about the fund.

The Exploring Engagement Fund for Priority Regions will enable us to work with local arts nonprofits to increase the engagement of Californians in these areas of the state. It is similar to our statewide Exploring Engagement Fund but is only open to nonprofits located within the ten counties of the San Joaquin Valley and the two counties of the Inland Empire. These nonprofits will fill out a slightly different application than the statewide fund and will also receive additional technical assistance in filling out the applications, if so desired.

For the information session in Fresno, we partnered with the Fresno Regional Foundation. Senior Program Officer Sandra Flores and Foundation Support Specialist Sarah Soberal helped coordinate the session and helped spread the word about the sessions to local arts groups. Irvine's Senior Program Officer Jeanne Sakamoto joined me in Fresno on April 12 for the San Joaquin Valley information session that was attended by more than 40 arts leaders in the region.

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Irvine Board Approves $4 Million in Grants

BY Daniel Silverman
Daniel Silverman
A native Californian, Daniel Silverman leads the Foundation’s communications wor
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| Mar 12, 2012

More than $4 million in grants was approved last week by the Irvine board at its quarterly meeting. The board approved 10 grants — four in the Arts, four in California Democracy and two in Youth — and signed off on a total grants budget of $68 million for this year. Here are a few grants that we’re particularly excited about:

California Calls — With California’s finances in an historic bind, an alliance of civic and community organizations, known as California Calls, is pursuing an ambitious plan to help turn things around. Partnering with 25 organizations in 10 counties, the alliance has been educating working class people on issues of state fiscal policy that are normally the province of policy experts and think tanks. With an $800,000 grant, its second from Irvine, California Calls aims to expand its growing alliance to other parts of California, with the goal of reaching half a million voters and energizing them around the cause of improving the state’s fiscal system. The grant, part of Irvine’s California Democracy program, was made to the Los Angeles-based Strategic Concepts in Organizing and Policy Education, the lead organization for California Calls.

California School Boards Foundation — Our Youth program promotes Linked Learning as a new approach to high school education that combines strong academics with real-world experience in a wide range of fields. With a $400,000 grant, the California School Boards Foundation will raise awareness of Linked Learning among California school board members and district leadership teams. CSBF plans to implement a statewide educational program for newly elected and veteran school board members and district governance teams to showcase the Linked Learning approach. It also plans to identify obstacles to implementing Linked Learning and assist governance teams in developing policies that ensure its success, part of a broader effort to build the Linked Learning field in California and make it an option for more students.

Cornerstone Theater — The Los Angeles-based Cornerstone Theater takes community-based theater in California to an entirely new level. Under one of its programs, long supported by Irvine, Cornerstone each year selects an underserved California community for an in depth collaboration. Professional artists live and work alongside local residents to create a new play informed by local issues. The play is then performed by professional and amateur actors at performance sites central and meaningful to the community. The company has already produced eight well-received plays in California communities, and with a new $425,000 grant from Irvine, Cornerstone will bring its unique approach to the cities of Arvin (Kern County) and Salinas.

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Regional Initiative Empowers Parents To Develop Civic Engagement Skills

BY Alex Barnum
Alex Barnum
Alex Barnum was a Communications Officer at The James Irvine Foundation from 200
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| Oct 01, 2011

State budget cuts have forced California school districts to take drastic measures in recent years. But in the sprawling Lodi Unified School District, a proposal to eliminate 32 staff positions providing bilingual services was still a shock to Ger Vang, CEO of the Lao Family Community, when he learned it was on the agenda for the district’s June board meeting.

The proposal, he knew, would be a blow for the district’s 49 schools, which have one of the state’s most diverse student populations. But it would be particularly devastating to a growing effort to involve the district’s parents in their children’s education. Many of these parents speak a language other than English as their primary language, including Spanish, Hmong, Cambodian and Vietnamese.

“Parents want to support district policies,” recalls Vang, a Hmong refugee from Laos whose organization is one of the leaders in the parent-engagement effort. “But when there are no interpreters during meetings, parents feel excluded and stop participating.” He knew it would be important for the Lodi school board to hear from these parents before voting on the measure.

Many parents in the San Joaquin Valley’s low-income and ethnic communities are not accustomed to having a voice in debates like these. Yet studies show that when parents do speak out at school board meetings or organize themselves, they can make a difference. Their efforts have contributed to changes in educational policy and funding decisions in counties throughout the state.

The Irvine Foundation, as part of its focus on increasing civic engagement in underrepresented communities in California, launched its Families Improving Education Initiative in 2008 to promote this kind of involvement. The initiative is managed by Families In Schools, a Los Angeles-based nonprofit that, in turn, is working with 11 community organizations in the Central Valley and Inland Empire.

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California School Network Readies Students for College and Career

BY Daniel Silverman
Daniel Silverman
A native Californian, Daniel Silverman leads the Foundation’s communications wor
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| Jul 01, 2011
This article first appeared in Education Week, June 9, 2011. Reprinted with permission from Editorial Projects in Education.

To the national debate about whether students should pursue career and technical education or college preparation, a California program wants to add an emphatic declaration: Yes.

The refusal to choose between one instructional emphasis or the other symbolizes the work being done to build career pathways in nine school districts as part of Linked Learning, an initiative cited as a national model of career and technical education.

One of the places the project is unfolding is in a cluster of high schools in the Porterville Unified School District, which serves a predominantly Latino, low-income community here among the San Joaquin Valley’s olive and orange groves.

At one school, a half-dozen students huddle around big desktop computers. The complex formulas they’re calculating and programming into the computer will tell a robot how to restack blocks of blue and red cubes. When they give the robot the command, the job comes off perfectly. Barely old enough to drive, these students are learning to negotiate the real-world engineering that shapes manufacturing.

A few hallways away, teenagers master the high-tech tools of the performing arts world. Aspiring musicians sit at rows of electric pianos, listening through headsets to the music they create as it is automatically notated on computer screens. At another school, students juggle computers and soundboards to produce a morning broadcast.

When they’re not in classrooms, students from these schools are out in the community, working in local engineering companies, staging musicals with preschoolers, or helping design sound for a street concert.

The point, leaders of the work say, is to create a more relevant, engaging school experience for young people by blending the rigorous core academics they need for college with the career and technical education that prepares them for good jobs, and to do it in an applied, hands-on way that includes real-life work experience.

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Study Reveals Increase in College Attendance Among Linked Learning Students

BY Daniel Silverman
Daniel Silverman
A native Californian, Daniel Silverman leads the Foundation’s communications wor
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| Feb 01, 2011

When rigorous academics are combined with demanding technical learning and real-world experience, students are better prepared to succeed after high school. Embracing that Linked Learning model, the Center for Advanced Research and Technology (CART), a high school in Clovis, Calif., released data on Jan. 11 that clearly shows Linked Learning can lead to a higher percentage of college enrollments.

The seven-year study found that participation in CART's Linked Learning approach increased the community college entrance rate by 11 percentage points — 71 percent for CART students compared with 60 percent for a demographically similar group of non-CART students. Entrance rates to four-year colleges were also higher for CART students. Read the CART report or the news release announcing the results.

"The message is clear: When students see a connection between what they're learning today and what they're earning tomorrow, they're more successful in the classroom, in college and, ultimately, in the workplace," said California's Superintendent of Instruction Tom Torlakson, as part of the study's release.

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Irvine Announces $21.4 Million in New Grants

BY Ray Delgado
Ray Delgado
Ray Delgado was with The James Irvine Foundation from 2006 to 2013, last serving
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| Oct 06, 2010

San Francisco The Board of Directors of The James Irvine Foundation has approved 31 grants totaling nearly $21.4 million in support of the Foundation's mission of expanding opportunity for the people of California to participate in a vibrant, successful and inclusive society. (For a list of approved grants, click here.)

Improving Sustainability of Leading Arts Organizations

Grants approved as part of the Arts program include nearly $3.8 million to 12 leading organizations in the Central Valley that are participating in phase two of the Arts Regional Initiative. Each grantee proposes projects that would address the dual challenges of building organizational capacities and financial stability, while improving programs to increase cultural participation. These grants are aligned with the goal of Irvine’s Arts program, which seeks to promote a vibrant and inclusive artistic and cultural environment in California.

Advancing Reforms to Improve California’s State Governance and Fiscal Systems

Grants approved as part of the California Democracy program include a $6 million renewal grant to California Forward that provides support for the organization to advance reforms to improve California’s state governance and fiscal systems. California Forward is a bipartisan organization bringing Californians together to advance governance and fiscal reforms that lead to a more responsive, effective and accountable government in California. The grant is aligned with Irvine’s California Democracy program, which seeks to advance effective public policy decision making that is reflective of and responsive to all Californians.

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Twelve Central Valley Arts Institutions Receive $3.8 Million to Expand Audiences and Increase Financial Sustainability

BY Ray Delgado
Ray Delgado
Ray Delgado was with The James Irvine Foundation from 2006 to 2013, last serving
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| Oct 05, 2010
San FranciscoThe James Irvine Foundation today announced $3.8 million in grants to 12 arts institutions in the Central Valley that are committed to broadening and diversifying their audiences and strengthening their financial sustainability. The organizations selected this year for the Arts Regional Initiative are planning to use the grants to advance financial sustainability within a challenging economic environment and to increase cultural participation from underrepresented communities. While each institution is developing specific plans, initiative participants are updating their strategic plans to recalibrate for the current economy, strengthening and diversifying board leadership, and developing culturally relevant artistic programs to attract diverse audiences and deepen existing ones.

“The Central Valley has been hit harder than most California regions by the recession, so it is more important than ever that we emphasize our commitment to these regional arts organizations as they explore new ways of achieving financial sustainability and attracting culturally diverse audiences,” noted Jim Canales, the Irvine Foundation’s President and CEO.

The organizations represent a mix of artistic disciplines, including music, dance, opera, theater, visual arts and multidisciplinary arts. The grants will be awarded over three years and grantees will share resources, best practices and lessons learned. A complete list of grantees follows:

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From the President: Engaging Our Partners

BY Jim Canales
Jim Canales
Jim Canales served as President and Chief Executive Officer of The James Irvine
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| Oct 01, 2010
Jim Canales, President & CEO

Dear Friends,

Many ingredients contribute to effective philanthropy, but one of the more important approaches is an authentic commitment to listen and learn from the communities and institutions we support. While we at the Irvine Foundation can certainly do more in this regard — a theme I will turn to later in this letter — I wanted to share some recent activities we have undertaken to demonstrate our ongoing commitment to this approach.

For me, this commitment must start with the governing board. Irvine has built a board that both brings a range of perspectives and experiences to its leadership role and that broadly represents the rich diversity of our state. In addition, for each of the past four years, we have focused one of our quarterly board meetings on opportunities for board members to engage directly with community leaders and to see first hand the work of our partners.

Last year, our board met in Los Angeles, where we explored the challenges and opportunities facing arts organizations in the context of that region’s vibrant arts economy. The previous year we met in Sacramento, where our board heard from our partners in the public policy arena and observed through a site visit the power of the Linked Learning approach to high-school education. And just this year, in early October, we traveled to Fresno, with the goal of deepening the board’s collective understanding of both the challenges and opportunities facing the San Joaquin Valley. This region has been a priority for our funding in recent years based on its rapidly growing population and shifting demographics, a high proportion of low-income residents, and a history of being underserved by traditional philanthropy.

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Irvine Announces $8.6 Million in New Grants

BY Ray Delgado
Ray Delgado
Ray Delgado was with The James Irvine Foundation from 2006 to 2013, last serving
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| Jun 17, 2010

San Francisco The Board of Directors of The James Irvine Foundation has approved 15 grants totaling nearly $8.6 million in support of the Foundation's mission of expanding opportunity for the people of California to participate in a vibrant, successful and inclusive society. (For a list of approved grants, click here.)

Supporting Innovation Among Major Arts Institutions

Grants approved as part of the Arts program include $3.7 million to five major California arts institutions through Irvine's Arts Innovation Fund (AIF). The Fine Arts Museums in San Francisco, the La Jolla Playhouse, the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles, the Music Center in Los Angeles and the San Francisco Symphony will each receive grants to support creative audience development approaches and/or innovative programming plans. All of the organizations are previous AIF grantees and some will receive funding to further institutionalize projects that were previously funded; others are proposing new innovations that will be developed. These grants are aligned with the goal of Irvine's Arts program, which seeks to promote a vibrant and inclusive artistic and cultural environment in California.

Establishing a Linked Learning Center

Grants approved as part of Irvine’s Youth program include a $750,000 grant to the Los Angeles Small Schools Center to establish a regional Linked Learning Center in Los Angeles. The center would support Linked Learning practice at Los Angeles Unified School District's Local District 4 while also providing specialized support to other Los Angeles area Linked Learning District Demonstration sites. The center will also identify potential new Linked Learning districts within LAUSD over the next two years. Grants made as part of Irvine's Youth program seek to increase the number of low income youth in California who complete high school on time and attain a postsecondary credential by the age of 25.

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Irvine Announces $21 Million in New Grants

BY Ray Delgado
Ray Delgado
Ray Delgado was with The James Irvine Foundation from 2006 to 2013, last serving
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| Jun 17, 2009

San Francisco The Board of Directors of The James Irvine Foundation has approved 21 grants totaling more than $21 million in support of the Foundation's mission of expanding opportunity for the people of California to participate in a vibrant, successful and inclusive society. (For a list of approved grants, click here.)

Of the $21 million, $3.3 million will support four California arts organizations that are developing innovative ways to deepen their engagement with audiences. A $750,000 grant through the California Democracy program will fund the Center on Race, Poverty and the Environment to promote the systematic inclusion of low-income residents in Tulare, Kern and Kings counties in land-use decision making. Additionally, a grant in the Youth program will provide $11.3 million to implement comprehensive multiple pathways programs at various school districts within California.

Developing New Approaches to Attract Audiences for the Arts

The goal of Irvine’s Arts program is to promote a vibrant and inclusive artistic and cultural environment in California. Grants approved as part of the Arts program include $3.3 million to support four California arts organizations through Irvine’s Arts Innovation Fund (AIF). The American Conservatory Theater (ACT) in San Francisco, the Armand Hammer Museum in Los Angeles, the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego (MCASD) and the Oakland Museum of California will each receive grants to support creative audience-development approaches and/or innovative programming plans. The grants fund new innovations at ACT and MCASD and help the Hammer and Oakland museums to institutionalize and sustain innovative practices that were funded by Irvine in 2006 as part of AIF.

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Leadership Award Recipients Tackle Key Issues, Balance Competing Interests in Central Valley

BY Alex Barnum
Alex Barnum
Alex Barnum was a Communications Officer at The James Irvine Foundation from 200
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| Jan 22, 2009

It's good orchard land here along the banks of the Sacramento River, nearly 70 miles north of Sacramento, as a recent planting attests. Ranks of young trees sink their tap roots into the rich loam. In a year or two, these saplings will tower over the two men who now walk the rows, evaluating the progress of their project.

This bucolic agrarian scene is interrupted abruptly by the appearance of a black-tailed deer bursting through the foliage. It's a big buck, with sunlight glinting off its impressive set of antlers. In a few stiff-legged bounds, it disappears from sight.

Deer in an orchard usually isn't the kind of sight that gladdens a farmer's heart, but the two men surveying the planting smile broadly. "Wow, that's a nice buck," says John Carlon, as his partner, Tom Griggs, nods appreciatively. "And it's a good indicator that we're on the right track."

The James Irvine Foundation Leadership Awards

"River Partners reminds us that, as insurmountable as some challenges may appear, solutions are in reach."

– Amy Dominguez-Arms, director of the Irvine
Foundation's California Perspectives program

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New Study Finds Best Approaches For Engaging Infrequent Voters

BY Alex Barnum
Alex Barnum
Alex Barnum was a Communications Officer at The James Irvine Foundation from 200
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| Sep 02, 2007

It's good orchard land here along the banks of the Sacramento River, nearly 70 miles north of Sacramento, as a recent planting attests. Ranks of young trees sink their tap roots into the rich loam. In a year or two, these saplings will tower over the two men who now walk the rows, evaluating the progress of their project.

This bucolic agrarian scene is interrupted abruptly by the appearance of a black-tailed deer bursting through the foliage. It's a big buck, with sunlight glinting off its impressive set of antlers. In a few stiff-legged bounds, it disappears from sight.

Deer in an orchard usually isn't the kind of sight that gladdens a farmer's heart, but the two men surveying the planting smile broadly. "Wow, that's a nice buck," says John Carlon, as his partner, Tom Griggs, nods appreciatively. "And it's a good indicator that we're on the right track."

The James Irvine Foundation Leadership Awards

"River Partners reminds us that, as insurmountable as some challenges may appear, solutions are in reach."

– Amy Dominguez-Arms, director of the Irvine
Foundation's California Perspectives program

Read more >>

Farmworkers Mobilize on Environmental Issues

BY Thuy Nguyen Kumar
Thuy Nguyen Kumar
As Communications Project Manager, Thuy provides project support for a broad ran
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| Jun 22, 2007
Tulare County, in the San Joaquin Valley, is a place most Californians pass by without much reflection on the drive between San Francisco and Los Angeles. Sprawling over the flatlands and foothills east of Highway 5, it claims the title of the world's center of milk production. Until recently, the county's 400,000 dairy cows outnumbered its humans.

Tulare's 300 dairies produce wealth for some, but not for the majority of its residents, more than half of whom are Latino. Four in ten local adults never graduated high school. According to the 2000 U.S. census, Tulare has the highest poverty rate of any county in the state.

A worker tills the soil on a farm in the San Joaquin Valley.

"When local residents are not at the public meetings, nobody speaks to their issues. But when they're present, they can speak for themselves, and have a greater chance of sharing in Tulare County's future prosperity," said Caroline Farrell, managing attorney in the Delano office of the Center on Race, Poverty and the Environment.

Residents often must endure unhealthy air. The San Joaquin Valley has the state's worst smog, and particle pollution from the dairies is likely a factor in Tulare residents' exceptionally high rates of asthma. Schoolchildren have become ill from pesticides sprayed on fields close to their classrooms. On summer days, when temperatures commonly exceed 110 degrees, dust from the traffic on unpaved roadsides fills the air.

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Irvine Grants Assist Farmworkers Left Jobless by January Freeze

BY Ray Delgado
Ray Delgado
Ray Delgado was with The James Irvine Foundation from 2006 to 2013, last serving
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| Mar 22, 2007
Last January's sub-freezing temperatures caused more than $1.4 billion in damages to Californias oranges, lemons, avocados and other signature crops. It was a disaster for many farmers and resulted in higher prices for consumers. But it has also become a broader human emergency.

Tens of thousands of farmworkers, packers and truck drivers — who play an integral role in the success of California agriculture — now face weeks and even months of unemployment because of the freeze. Many have been left without enough money for food, rent or mortgage payments, utilities, and other essentials.

Orange trees in Exeter, Calif., damaged by Januarys sub-freezing temperatures (AP photo)

"More than two months after the freeze, we are seeing needs increase, not decrease, in our community," said Mary Panesar, Executive Director of the Desert Community Foundation in Palm Desert. "These grants will provide immediate relief in response to this human crisis by providing much-needed assistance to local farmworkers and their families."

The impact has been hardest among communities in the east San Joaquin Valley, the heart of the state's citrus growing industry. But the effects are also being felt in the Coachella Valley and the Central Coast, and among workers who tend a range of crops, including strawberries, lettuce, artichokes, and others.

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Philanthropic Activity in California's Central Valley

BY Daniel Silverman
Daniel Silverman
A native Californian, Daniel Silverman leads the Foundation’s communications wor
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| Mar 22, 2003
In a tough economic climate, regions like California's Central Valley are seeing fewer dollars than they did a few years ago, and local nonprofits are struggling to support services and related capacity-building efforts critical to the infrastructure in rapidly growing areas. The Center for Philanthropy and Public Policy at the University of Southern California recently released a report detailing the philanthropic activity in the Valley over the period 1996-1999.

Philanthropic Activity in California's Central Valley: 1996-1999 is the first part of a larger study examining philanthropic trends in the region over the six years from 1996-2002 in an effort to document philanthropic resources into the region as well as the region's own philanthropic capacity. The purpose of this study is to inform those who are investing or might invest in this important region of California, as well as those within the region working to build the capacity of the philanthropic and nonprofit sectors.

The Central Valley experienced a significant increase in philanthropic activity over the 1996-1999 period. The growth in the number of grants awarded into the Valley and the expanding philanthropic capacity of the area are welcome by-and new to-local nonprofits. The struggle is in how to sustain and increase these funding efforts. The trends in the region mirror, in general, those within the State and across the nation.

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CORAL Summer Youth Institutes Focus on Technology

BY Daniel Silverman
Daniel Silverman
A native Californian, Daniel Silverman leads the Foundation’s communications wor
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| Mar 22, 2003
Armed with video cameras and laptop computers equipped with satellite uplinks to the Internet, 35 teenagers are scattering through the woods, meadows, and lake ecosystems that make up Long Beach’s El Dorado Nature Center. The video footage is destined to become part of a 45-minute documentary they will create, while the laptops are needed to help these amateur naturalists categorize plant and animal species they will encounter.

Youth Institute learning activities integrate computers, video, and the Internet.

Meanwhile, in Pasadena, 40 teenagers are busy constructing a scale model of an ancient Egyptian civilization. Over a six-week period they build an ancient home from mud and bricks, learn hieroglyphics, grow papyrus and make paper, and write about it all on a website they create themselves. In the process of their immersion into Egyptology, they acquire hands-on knowledge of photography, computer graphics, art appreciation, math, communications and journaling, archeology, ancient religions and leadership skills.

These youth were participating in the CORAL Youth Institute.

The Youth Institutes were conceived as a way to engage high-school students in the CORAL afterschool program, giving them academic enrichment, work experience and community involvement. The concept was created to serve as a "ladder of opportunity" where older youth learn skills and then pass on that knowledge to younger children enrolled in Communities Organizing Resources to Advance Learning—CORAL , an Irvine initiative designed to boost student achievement through out-of-school programs in five California communities. While CORAL primarily reaches elementary-school children, older youth have important roles to play in designing, governing, offering, publicizing, and assessing CORAL programs. Older youth are role models and peer educators of the children, and can influence their parents and other adults in the community, especially as participants in the youth institutes.

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A Challenging View of the Future for Education in a California Region

BY Daniel Silverman
Daniel Silverman
A native Californian, Daniel Silverman leads the Foundation’s communications wor
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| Sep 22, 2002
Twenty percent of California's public-school students attend schools in the Central Valley. Many of these students are at risk of poor educational outcomes: One-quarter of the children in grades K-5 do not speak English or do not speak it well; one-half of all K-12 students participate in a subsidized lunch program. The Central Valley has one of the fastest growing populations in State, yet the region is trailing on several student and school indicators, according to a recent study by the Public Policy Institute of California (PPIC).

In Student and School Indicators for Youth in California's Central Valley, PPIC provides a statistical portrait of elementary, secondary, and postsecondary education in the region. Though policy implications of the data are left to interpretation, the report makes it clear that the Valley trails the rest of the State along several dimensions, including student socioeconomic status, test scores, college preparation, and four-year college attendance.

Source: Public Policy Institute of California.

The PPIC study was commissioned by The James Irvine Foundation as the first of two reports documenting the condition and circumstances of youth in the Valley. This first report examines school resources, course enrollment, and student achievement in the Valley's four major regions-North Valley, Sacramento Metro, North San Joaquin, and South San Joaquin. Differences between these regions surface in the report, with the North and South San Joaquin regions appearing particularly disadvantaged. The second report will focus on social and economic trends.

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